It took Adolf Hitler and his Nazi cohorts 12 years to round up and murder 6 million Jews, but their Teutonic cousins, the British, managed to kill almost 4 million Indians in just over a year, with Prime Minister Winston Churchill cheering from the sidelines. Australian biochemist Dr Gideon Polya has called the Bengal Famine a “manmade holocaust” because Churchill’s policies were directly responsible for the disaster. Bengal had a bountiful harvest in 1942, but the British started diverting vast quantities of food grain from India to Britain, contributing to a massive food shortage in the areas comprising present-day West Bengal, Odisha, Bihar and Bangladesh. Author Madhusree Mukerjee tracked down some of the survivors and paints a chilling picture of the effects of hunger and deprivation. In Churchill’s Secret War, she writes: “Parents dumped their starving children into rivers and wells. Many took their lives by throwing themselves in front of trains. Starving people begged for the starchy water in which rice had been boiled. Children ate leaves and vines, yam stems and grass. People were too weak even to cremate their loved ones.”

Remembering India’s Forgotten Holocaust. 

Sarah Waheed notes: “One of the students in my modern South Asia history class a few years ago, was extremely upset that the book we were reading referred to the Bengal famine as a holocaust, calling the author ‘biased’. When I asked him to clarify and elaborate upon what he meant by ‘biased’, he exclaimed, inflamed, “There was only one holocaust!” The rest of the students were, however, more open to the idea of the 20th century being a century of multiple holocausts. The terms ‘holocaust’ and ‘genocide’, however, continue to elicit trauma envy.”

(via mehreenkasana)

wolfmanssister:


annie-banks:
 #okay so this is pretty much 100% professor longbottom right here #because you know neville would kind of end up being the cool professor without knowing it #he would be the ~war hero legend that wears hipster sweaters before they became popular and has a scottish accent #and would totally have sunglasses 1000% and would wear them when the were out on the grounds cataloging plant life around the lake #and would only wear his robes part of the time b/c it’s hard to tend to plants in full robes duh #and would have all these weird pieces of jewlery that he wears because he got them in some foreign country while researching cacti or something #professor longbottom: unintentional hogwarts heartthrob

Goddamn…

wolfmanssister:

annie-banks:

 #okay so this is pretty much 100% professor longbottom right here #because you know neville would kind of end up being the cool professor without knowing it #he would be the ~war hero legend that wears hipster sweaters before they became popular and has a scottish accent #and would totally have sunglasses 1000% and would wear them when the were out on the grounds cataloging plant life around the lake #and would only wear his robes part of the time b/c it’s hard to tend to plants in full robes duh #and would have all these weird pieces of jewlery that he wears because he got them in some foreign country while researching cacti or something #professor longbottom: unintentional hogwarts heartthrob

Goddamn…

Reblogged from roastytoasty

The mower stalled, twice; kneeling, I found
A hedgehog jammed up against the blades,
Killed. It had been in the long grass.

I had seen it before, and even fed it, once.
Now I had mauled its unobtrusive world
Unmendably. Burial was no help:

Next morning I got up and it did not.
The first day after a death, the new absence
Is always the same; we should be careful

Of each other, we should be kind
While there is still time.

Philip Larkin, The Mower (via fishingboatproceeds)